Widu

Plaudern Politik Kultur Sprache Forum
Aktuelle Zeit: 23. Okt 2018, 18:32

Alle Zeiten sind UTC + 1 Stunde [ Sommerzeit ]


Forumsregeln


Please write English only! -Bitte nur auf Englisch schreiben!



Ein neues Thema erstellen Auf das Thema antworten  [ 20 Beiträge ] 
AutorNachricht
 Betreff des Beitrags: Rare and special English words explained
BeitragVerfasst: 25. Jan 2018, 14:31 
Online
Forstrat
Forstrat
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 09.2008
Beiträge: 64328
Wohnort: im Lärchenwald
Geschlecht: männlich
Titel: Larix decidua
I start with: mansuetude

Zitat:
Mansuetude was first used in English in the 14th century, and it derives from the Latin verb mansuescere, which means "to tame." Mansuescere itself comes from the noun manus (meaning "hand") and the verb suescere ("to accustom" or "to become accustomed"). Unlike manus, which has many English descendants (including manner, emancipate, and manicure), suescere has only a few English progeny. One of them is desuetude, which means "disuse" and comes to us by way of Latin desuescere ("to become unaccustomed"). Two others are custom and accustom, which derive via Anglo-French from Latin consuescere, meaning "to accustom."



*** Der Link ist nur für Mitglieder sichtbar, zum Login. ***

More later. :nick

_________________
Waldbaum = Dundee = Larix = die Lärche in allen 4 Jahreszeiten

Gebt den Lärchen diese Welt!


Nach oben
 Profil Besuche Website  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Rare and special English words explained
BeitragVerfasst: 26. Jan 2018, 13:15 
Online
Forstrat
Forstrat
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 09.2008
Beiträge: 64328
Wohnort: im Lärchenwald
Geschlecht: männlich
Titel: Larix decidua
retrodict

Definition: to utilize present information or ideas to infer or explain (a past event or state of affairs)

Zitat:
We predict that you will guess the correct origins of retrodict, and chances are we will not contradict you. English speakers had started using predict by at least the late 16th century; it's a word formed by combining prae- (meaning "before") and dicere (meaning "to say"). Since the rough translation of predict is "to say before," it's no surprise that when people in the early 20th century wanted a word for "predicting" the past, they created it by combining the prefix for "backward" (retro-) with the -dict of predict. Other dicere descendants in English include contradict, benediction, dictate, diction, and dictionary.


*** Der Link ist nur für Mitglieder sichtbar, zum Login. ***

_________________
Waldbaum = Dundee = Larix = die Lärche in allen 4 Jahreszeiten

Gebt den Lärchen diese Welt!


Nach oben
 Profil Besuche Website  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Rare and special English words explained
BeitragVerfasst: 27. Jan 2018, 12:37 
Online
Forstrat
Forstrat
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 09.2008
Beiträge: 64328
Wohnort: im Lärchenwald
Geschlecht: männlich
Titel: Larix decidua
nebulous

Zitat:
Nebulous comes from the Latin word nebulosus, meaning "misty," which in turn comes from nebula, meaning "mist," "fog," or "cloud." In the 18th century, English speakers borrowed nebula and gave it a somewhat more specific meaning than the Latin version. In English, nebula refers to a cloud of gas or dust in deep space, or in less technical contexts, simply to a galaxy.

Nebulous itself, when it doesn't have interstellar implications, usually means "cloudy" or "foggy" in a figurative sense. One's memory of a long-past event, for example, will often be nebulous; a teenager might give a nebulous recounting of an evening's events upon coming home; or a politician might make a campaign promise but give only a nebulous description of how he or she would fulfill it.


*** Der Link ist nur für Mitglieder sichtbar, zum Login. ***

_________________
Waldbaum = Dundee = Larix = die Lärche in allen 4 Jahreszeiten

Gebt den Lärchen diese Welt!


Nach oben
 Profil Besuche Website  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Rare and special English words explained
BeitragVerfasst: 28. Jan 2018, 14:17 
Online
Forstrat
Forstrat
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 09.2008
Beiträge: 64328
Wohnort: im Lärchenwald
Geschlecht: männlich
Titel: Larix decidua
popinjay

Definition: a strutting supercilious person

Zitat:
Popinjays and parrots are birds of a feather. Popinjay, from the Middle French word papegai, is the original name for a parrot in English. The French word, in turn, came from the Arabic word for the bird, babghā’. Parrot, which English speakers adopted later, is probably a modification of the Middle French perroquet, which is also the source of the English parakeet. In the days of Middle English, parrots were rare and exotic, and it was quite a compliment to be called a popinjay after such a beautiful bird. But by the 1500s, parrots had become more commonplace, and their gaudy plumage and vulgar mimicry helped popinjay develop the pejorative sense we use today.


*** Der Link ist nur für Mitglieder sichtbar, zum Login. ***

_________________
Waldbaum = Dundee = Larix = die Lärche in allen 4 Jahreszeiten

Gebt den Lärchen diese Welt!


Nach oben
 Profil Besuche Website  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Rare and special English words explained
BeitragVerfasst: 31. Jan 2018, 09:37 
Offline
Widukind
Widukind
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 12.2017
Beiträge: 655
Wohnort: Rundu
Geschlecht: männlich
Titel: Onderwyser
Have you ever heart this: latitudinarian? :)

_________________
die perd wat die hawer verdien, kry dit nie altyd nie


Nach oben
 Profil Persönliches Album  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Rare and special English words explained
BeitragVerfasst: 31. Jan 2018, 10:46 
Online
Forstrat
Forstrat
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 09.2008
Beiträge: 64328
Wohnort: im Lärchenwald
Geschlecht: männlich
Titel: Larix decidua
Not yet! :nein

_________________
Waldbaum = Dundee = Larix = die Lärche in allen 4 Jahreszeiten

Gebt den Lärchen diese Welt!


Nach oben
 Profil Besuche Website  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Rare and special English words explained
BeitragVerfasst: 31. Jan 2018, 13:15 
Offline
Widukind
Widukind
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 12.2017
Beiträge: 655
Wohnort: Rundu
Geschlecht: männlich
Titel: Onderwyser
means:holding broad and tolerant views, especially in religious matters

_________________
die perd wat die hawer verdien, kry dit nie altyd nie


Nach oben
 Profil Persönliches Album  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Rare and special English words explained
BeitragVerfasst: 1. Feb 2018, 01:56 
Offline
Forstrat
Forstrat
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 10.2008
Beiträge: 58016
Wohnort: Schwarzwald und Schottland
Geschlecht: männlich
Titel: Laird of Glencairn
:thumbsup

_________________
Gnädigster und durchlauchtigster aller Lords der Highlands and Islands, Bezwinger des Loch-Ness-Monsters,
Freund der Stewarts, Herrscher über Caithness, Orkney and Shetland,
Fürst der Fair Isle und der nördlichen Nordsee, Lord of Inverness,
gefürsteter Herzog von Drumnadrochit, Blairgowrie and Dunkeld


Nach oben
 Profil Besuche Website  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Rare and special English words explained
BeitragVerfasst: 1. Feb 2018, 12:23 
Offline
Forstrat
Forstrat
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 10.2008
Beiträge: 58016
Wohnort: Schwarzwald und Schottland
Geschlecht: männlich
Titel: Laird of Glencairn
preternatural

Definition

1 existing outside of nature

2 exceeding what is natural or regular : extraordinary

3 inexplicable by ordinary means; especially : psychic

Zitat:
Preternatural derives from the Latin phrase praeter naturam, which means "beyond nature." Medieval Latin scholars rendered the term as praeternaturalis, and that form inspired the modern English version. Unusual things are sometimes considered positive and sometimes negative, and throughout its history preternatural has been used to refer to both exceptionally good things and unnaturally evil ones. In its earliest documented uses in the 1500s, it tended to emphasize the strange, ominous, or foreboding, but by the 1700s, people were using it more benignly to refer to fascinating supernatural (or even heavenly) phenomena. Nowadays, people regularly use it to describe the remarkable abilities of exceptional humans.



*** Der Link ist nur für Mitglieder sichtbar, zum Login. ***

_________________
Gnädigster und durchlauchtigster aller Lords der Highlands and Islands, Bezwinger des Loch-Ness-Monsters,
Freund der Stewarts, Herrscher über Caithness, Orkney and Shetland,
Fürst der Fair Isle und der nördlichen Nordsee, Lord of Inverness,
gefürsteter Herzog von Drumnadrochit, Blairgowrie and Dunkeld


Nach oben
 Profil Besuche Website  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Rare and special English words explained
BeitragVerfasst: 4. Feb 2018, 12:28 
Offline
Forstrat
Forstrat
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 10.2008
Beiträge: 58016
Wohnort: Schwarzwald und Schottland
Geschlecht: männlich
Titel: Laird of Glencairn
blench

Zitat:
If a stranger approaches you in a dark alley, it might cause you to blench. Do you flinch or turn white? Actually, you could do both, and both would be considered blenching because there are two separate verbs spelled "blench" in English. The blench that means "to flinch" derives from blencan, an Old English word meaning "to deceive." The blench meaning "to turn white" is an alteration of blanch, from the French adjective blanc ("white"). Clues to which meaning is intended can often be found in context. The "flinch" use, for example, is strictly intransitive and often followed by from or at ("blenched from the sight of blood"; "didn’t blench at the sound of thunder"). The "whiten" use, meanwhile, can be intransitive ("his skin blenched with terror") or transitive ("the cold blenched her lips").


*** Der Link ist nur für Mitglieder sichtbar, zum Login. ***

_________________
Gnädigster und durchlauchtigster aller Lords der Highlands and Islands, Bezwinger des Loch-Ness-Monsters,
Freund der Stewarts, Herrscher über Caithness, Orkney and Shetland,
Fürst der Fair Isle und der nördlichen Nordsee, Lord of Inverness,
gefürsteter Herzog von Drumnadrochit, Blairgowrie and Dunkeld


Nach oben
 Profil Besuche Website  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Rare and special English words explained
BeitragVerfasst: 5. Feb 2018, 10:52 
Offline
Forstrat
Forstrat
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 10.2008
Beiträge: 58016
Wohnort: Schwarzwald und Schottland
Geschlecht: männlich
Titel: Laird of Glencairn
'Free Rein' or 'Free Reign'?

Zitat:

Coming here was an opportunity to redevelop the marketplace. I have free reign to build the brand.
— Chris Townson, quoted in Travel Weekly, 15 Dec. 2017
"I was given free reign to redesign the galleries," said Kowalski, who came to the Rockwell in March…."
— Jesse Kowalski, quoted in The Berkshire Eagle, 25 Sept. 2015
In the quotations above, it is quite possible the writers felt their interviewees possessed an unbridled royal authority to do as they please. But what follows "free reign" in the quotes suggests a different intent: the speakers are referring to the freedom granted to them to do as they choose—and not to their power as a ruler to do so. The misinterpretation of the set phrase "free rein"—referring to unrestricted liberty of action or decision—as "free reign" is an eggcorn that writers struggle with all too often.


The expression "free rein" originated as horseback-riding jargon referring to the act of holding the reins (the straps by which a rider controls the horse) loosely so as to allow the horse to freely move along at its own pace and in its desired direction. Figurative use of the phrase referring to freedom of action goes back to the 17th century.
The tongues of Angels are not able to expresse what benefits doe redound unto man by the right ordering of the tongue, and what harmes and inconveniences againe, when we give it free reines to lash out.
— Alexander Read, The Chirurgicall Lectures of Tumors and Ulcers, 1635
About two centuries later, the phrase perplexingly begins appearing in print in the form "free reign."
Here we may give free reign to our imagination, with the moral certainty that science will supply nothing tending either to prove or to disprove any of its fancies.
— The Salvator and Scientist (Chicago, Illinois), September 1896


Why it begins to appear during a time when the horse was still the primary mode of transportation is puzzling. On the other hand, in modern times, misinterpretation of "free rein" as "free reign" is a bit more understandable—though still grammatically wrong—after all, how often does the average person handle the reins of a horse? To those unfamiliar with the equestrian origin of the phrase, reign with its association with monarchy (influenced by the media's obsession with the English Royal Family) might seem the better choice than a word for straps to control a horse, and an Internet search will confirm that quite a few people agree.
If you are one of those people, we would like to offer a couple of mnemonics to help you mentally autocorrect "free reign" before it becomes an acceptable (yet still illogical) variant of "free rein." First, remember that reigning as king and queen entails having the freedom to choose and make decisions; therefore, monarchs have "free rein" during their reign. Also, there are a handful of other common figurative phrases originating from a horse's rein that you can associate with "free rein" if you have a brain cramp.
The supervisor has/keeps a tight rein on every stage of production.
We need to rein in our spending.
She handed over the reins of the company to her successor.
As you can see, rein is the word to use when implying holding back or granting freedom of action; reign, on the other hand, is reserved for the ruling over a people or land. "Free reign" might sound impressive to you but not to your editor or teacher.


*** Der Link ist nur für Mitglieder sichtbar, zum Login. ***

_________________
Gnädigster und durchlauchtigster aller Lords der Highlands and Islands, Bezwinger des Loch-Ness-Monsters,
Freund der Stewarts, Herrscher über Caithness, Orkney and Shetland,
Fürst der Fair Isle und der nördlichen Nordsee, Lord of Inverness,
gefürsteter Herzog von Drumnadrochit, Blairgowrie and Dunkeld


Nach oben
 Profil Besuche Website  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Rare and special English words explained
BeitragVerfasst: 7. Feb 2018, 12:23 
Offline
Forstrat
Forstrat
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 10.2008
Beiträge: 58016
Wohnort: Schwarzwald und Schottland
Geschlecht: männlich
Titel: Laird of Glencairn
carp

to find fault or complain querulously

Zitat:
You might guess that today's word is a descendant of the noun carp, referring to a type of fish. That's a reasonable speculation, but the words are unrelated. Both entered the English language in the 15th century but from different sources. Whereas the fish's name traces back to Latin carpa, the verb is of Scandinavian origin: it may be related to the Icelandic verb karpa, meaning "to dispute" or "to wrangle," and beyond that perhaps to Old Norse karp, meaning "boasting" or "arrogance." There is a noun carp that is related to the Scandinavian verb, however: it means "complaint," and it dates to that same century.


*** Der Link ist nur für Mitglieder sichtbar, zum Login. ***

_________________
Gnädigster und durchlauchtigster aller Lords der Highlands and Islands, Bezwinger des Loch-Ness-Monsters,
Freund der Stewarts, Herrscher über Caithness, Orkney and Shetland,
Fürst der Fair Isle und der nördlichen Nordsee, Lord of Inverness,
gefürsteter Herzog von Drumnadrochit, Blairgowrie and Dunkeld


Nach oben
 Profil Besuche Website  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Rare and special English words explained
BeitragVerfasst: 14. Feb 2018, 11:43 
Offline
Forstrat
Forstrat
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 10.2008
Beiträge: 58016
Wohnort: Schwarzwald und Schottland
Geschlecht: männlich
Titel: Laird of Glencairn
frolic

Definition

to amuse oneself : make merry
to play and run about happily : romp

Zitat:
Frolic is a playful word with a happy history. It traces back to the Dutch word vroolijk ("merry"), which in turn evolved from a Middle Dutch combination of vro ("happy") and the adjectival suffix -lijc ("-ly"). Vro is related to the Old Frisian and Old High German fro, which also means "happy." (It is also a distant relative of Old English frogga, from which Modern English derived frog.) When frolic first entered English in the early-mid 16th century, it was used as an adjective meaning "merry" or "full of fun." The verb came into use by the end of that century, followed a few decades later by a noun use, as in "an evening of fun and frolic."



*** Der Link ist nur für Mitglieder sichtbar, zum Login. ***

_________________
Gnädigster und durchlauchtigster aller Lords der Highlands and Islands, Bezwinger des Loch-Ness-Monsters,
Freund der Stewarts, Herrscher über Caithness, Orkney and Shetland,
Fürst der Fair Isle und der nördlichen Nordsee, Lord of Inverness,
gefürsteter Herzog von Drumnadrochit, Blairgowrie and Dunkeld


Nach oben
 Profil Besuche Website  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Rare and special English words explained
BeitragVerfasst: 22. Feb 2018, 10:59 
Offline
Forstrat
Forstrat
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 10.2008
Beiträge: 58016
Wohnort: Schwarzwald und Schottland
Geschlecht: männlich
Titel: Laird of Glencairn
plangent

Zitat:
Plangent adds power to our poetry and prose: the pounding of waves, the beat of wings, the tolling of a bell, the throbbing of the human heart, a lover's knocking at the door—all have been described as plangent. The word plangent traces back to the Latin verb plangere, which has two meanings. The first of those meanings, "to strike or beat," was sometimes used by Latin speakers in reference to striking one's breast in grief. This, in turn, led to the verb's second meaning: "to lament." The sense division carried over to the Latin adjective plangens and then into English, giving us the two distinct meanings of plangent: "pounding" and "expressive of melancholy."


*** Der Link ist nur für Mitglieder sichtbar, zum Login. ***

_________________
Gnädigster und durchlauchtigster aller Lords der Highlands and Islands, Bezwinger des Loch-Ness-Monsters,
Freund der Stewarts, Herrscher über Caithness, Orkney and Shetland,
Fürst der Fair Isle und der nördlichen Nordsee, Lord of Inverness,
gefürsteter Herzog von Drumnadrochit, Blairgowrie and Dunkeld


Nach oben
 Profil Besuche Website  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Rare and special English words explained
BeitragVerfasst: 2. Mär 2018, 21:34 
Offline
Forstrat
Forstrat
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 09.2008
Beiträge: 76898
Wohnort: Schwarzwald
Geschlecht: männlich
Titel: Admin-Lärche
nondescript

- belonging or appearing to belong to no particular class or kind : not easily described

- lacking distinctive or interesting qualities : dull, drab

Zitat:
It is relatively easy to describe the origins of nondescript (and there's a hint in the first part of this sentence). Nondescript was formed by combining the prefix non- (meaning "not") with descriptus,the past participle of the Latin verb describere, meaning "to describe." It is no surprise, then, that when the word was adopted in the late 17th century by English speakers, it was typically applied to something (such as a genus or species) that had not yet been described. Other descriptive descendants of describere in English include describe, description, and descriptive itself, as well as the rare philosophical term descriptum ("something that is described").


*** Der Link ist nur für Mitglieder sichtbar, zum Login. ***

_________________
Plec'h moc'h hwi, Brokilien, Vivian ha Merzin?
Plec'h moc'h hwi Brokilien, hunvreou pell a gevrin?


Nach oben
 Profil Besuche Website  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Rare and special English words explained
BeitragVerfasst: 4. Mär 2018, 12:11 
Offline
Forstrat
Forstrat
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 09.2008
Beiträge: 76898
Wohnort: Schwarzwald
Geschlecht: männlich
Titel: Admin-Lärche
cursory

rapidly and often superficially performed or produced : hasty

Zitat:
Cursory and its synonyms superficial and shallow all mean "lacking in depth or care"—but these words are not used in exactly the same way in all cases. Cursory, which comes from the Latin verb currere ("to run"), implies speed and stresses a lack of attention to detail. While cursory suggests a lack of thoroughness, superficial implies a concern only with surface aspects or obvious features. An analysis of a problem might be labeled "superficial" if it considers only the obvious and fails to dig deeper into the issue. Shallow is more generally derogatory in implying lack of depth in knowledge, reasoning, emotions, or character, as in "insensitive and shallow comments."


*** Der Link ist nur für Mitglieder sichtbar, zum Login. ***

_________________
Plec'h moc'h hwi, Brokilien, Vivian ha Merzin?
Plec'h moc'h hwi Brokilien, hunvreou pell a gevrin?


Nach oben
 Profil Besuche Website  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Rare and special English words explained
BeitragVerfasst: 5. Mär 2018, 12:05 
Offline
Forstrat
Forstrat
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 09.2008
Beiträge: 76898
Wohnort: Schwarzwald
Geschlecht: männlich
Titel: Admin-Lärche
rabble

- disorganized or confused collection of things
- a disorganized or disorderly crowd of people : mob
-the lowest class of people

Zitat:
Rabble has been with the English language since its appearance in Middle English (as rabel) around the turn of the 15th century. The Middle English rabel (originally used to denote a pack or swarm of animals or insects) may have come from the verb rabel which meant "to babble" (despite the similarity in sound and meaning, however, babble and rabble are linguistically unrelated). The verb rabel is related to Middle Dutch rabbelen and Low German rabbeln, meaning "to speak rapidly or indistinctly" or "to chatter." So how do we get from babbling to crowds of people? The connecting link may be the idea of confusion. Rabble, in its earliest uses, could indicate a pack of animals, a swarm of insects, or a confused collection of things, in addition to a confused or meaningless string of words.


*** Der Link ist nur für Mitglieder sichtbar, zum Login. ***

_________________
Plec'h moc'h hwi, Brokilien, Vivian ha Merzin?
Plec'h moc'h hwi Brokilien, hunvreou pell a gevrin?


Nach oben
 Profil Besuche Website  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Rare and special English words explained
BeitragVerfasst: 8. Mär 2018, 12:05 
Offline
Forstrat
Forstrat
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 09.2008
Beiträge: 76898
Wohnort: Schwarzwald
Geschlecht: männlich
Titel: Admin-Lärche
to bird-dog

Zitat:
People began using bird-dog as a verb meaning "to closely watch someone or something" or "to doggedly seek out someone or something" in the early 20th century. Both meanings reflect skills likely to be possessed by a well-trained bird dog—that is, a hunting dog trained to hunt or retrieve birds. By the 1930s, bird-dogging was being used specifically as a term for stealing someone else's date. And, not long after that, it began to be used for the scouting out of customers or prospective talent. The noun bird dog refers to the canines one would expect, and is also used as a name for the date stealers and scouts who do the bird-dogging.


*** Der Link ist nur für Mitglieder sichtbar, zum Login. ***

_________________
Plec'h moc'h hwi, Brokilien, Vivian ha Merzin?
Plec'h moc'h hwi Brokilien, hunvreou pell a gevrin?


Nach oben
 Profil Besuche Website  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Rare and special English words explained
BeitragVerfasst: 16. Mär 2018, 11:59 
Offline
Forstrat
Forstrat
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 09.2008
Beiträge: 76898
Wohnort: Schwarzwald
Geschlecht: männlich
Titel: Admin-Lärche
anent

= concerning

Zitat:
Anent looks like a rather old-fashioned word, and it is, in fact, very old: an earlier sense of the word can be found in Beowulf, from approximately 800 C.E. Anent was at one point almost obsolete—it had nearly died out by the 17th century—but it was revived in the 19th century. Various usage commentators have decried anent as "affected" and "archaic." The former complaint seems like a harsh judgment, and the latter is untrue: although anent is rarely heard in speech, examples of current use can easily be found in written sources, especially in Scottish English. Once a favored preposition in Scots law, it turns up today in the occasional letter to the editor ("Anent your article on…"). Dead words do occasionally rise from the grave, and anent is one of them.

Examples of ANENT

"Whatever the case, the undertaking was soon abandoned in disappointment and apparently with strong feelings anent the region itself."
— Wesley Frank Craven, The Southern Colonies in the 17th Century, 1970


*** Der Link ist nur für Mitglieder sichtbar, zum Login. ***

_________________
Plec'h moc'h hwi, Brokilien, Vivian ha Merzin?
Plec'h moc'h hwi Brokilien, hunvreou pell a gevrin?


Nach oben
 Profil Besuche Website  
 
 Betreff des Beitrags: Re: Rare and special English words explained
BeitragVerfasst: 17. Mär 2018, 12:18 
Offline
Forstrat
Forstrat
Benutzeravatar

Registriert: 09.2008
Beiträge: 76898
Wohnort: Schwarzwald
Geschlecht: männlich
Titel: Admin-Lärche
uncanny

- seeming to have a supernatural character or origin : eerie, mysterious

- being beyond what is normal or expected : suggesting superhuman or supernatural powers

Zitat:
Weird and eerie are synonyms of uncanny, but there are subtle differences in the meanings of the three words. Weird may be used to describe something that is generally strange or out of the ordinary. Eerie suggests an uneasy or fearful consciousness that some kind of mysterious and malign powers are at work, while uncanny, which debuted in the 18th century, implies disquieting strangeness or mysteriousness. English also has a word canny, but canny and uncanny should not be interpreted as opposites. Canny, which first appeared in English in the 16th century, means "clever," "shrewd," or "prudent," as in "a canny lawyer" or "a canny investment."


*** Der Link ist nur für Mitglieder sichtbar, zum Login. ***

_________________
Plec'h moc'h hwi, Brokilien, Vivian ha Merzin?
Plec'h moc'h hwi Brokilien, hunvreou pell a gevrin?


Nach oben
 Profil Besuche Website  
 
Beiträge der letzten Zeit anzeigen:  Sortiere nach  
Ein neues Thema erstellen Auf das Thema antworten  [ 20 Beiträge ] 

Alle Zeiten sind UTC + 1 Stunde [ Sommerzeit ]


Wer ist online?

Mitglieder in diesem Forum: 0 Mitglieder und 1 Gast


Du darfst keine neuen Themen in diesem Forum erstellen.
Du darfst keine Antworten zu Themen in diesem Forum erstellen.
Du darfst deine Beiträge in diesem Forum nicht ändern.
Du darfst deine Beiträge in diesem Forum nicht löschen.
Du darfst keine Dateianhänge in diesem Forum erstellen.

Gehe zu:  
web tracker